HANS AEBISCHER

CEO

HANS AEBISCHER

CEO

Born and raised in Switzerland, Hans Aebischer graduated with a degree in Restaurant and Business Management at Juventus Institute in Zurich, and proceeded to work on a cruise ship for many years. Eventually, he emigrated to the USA (San Francisco) and settled in Pasadena, California in 1981.

After some successful business ventures in the restaurant and money management industries, Hans saw the need to provide better IT services to small and medium-sized businesses. So, in 1998, he joined forces with Chuck Gagnon and co-founded AdviseTech. Hans is still going strong!


Phone:866.766.1313 EXT 5005

Email: Aebischer@advisetech.com


Chuck Gagnon

CIO

Chuck Gagnon

CIO

After obtaining his undergraduate degree, Chuck Gagnon graduated from DeVry Institute of Technology in 1979. From there, he worked for Intel Corporation for seven years: six of them doing in-house component-level troubleshooting, and one year in the field, where he worked on servers and PCs. In 1987, he accepted a position at Quotron, which was later bought by Reuters. While he was at Quotron/Reuters, he worked on systems at their main office in Los Angeles, California and travelled across the U.S.A. to train in-house technicians as well as those of of their third party vendors, including IBM.

Chuck was one of the premier installation and troubleshooting technicians in the country. He travelled extensively, working for some of the most prominent stock market providers in the country, such as Charles Schwab, Paine Webber, and Merrill Lynch. In 1998, Chuck co-founded AdviseTech, and in 2004 he left Reuters to dedicate his efforts to making AdviseTech the premium IT service provider it is today.


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: cgagnon@advisetech.com


Eric Govan

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT

Eric Govan

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT

Eric has been a resident of Northern Nevada for over 30 years and makes his home in Reno. His early career spans for over 20 years in the Radio and Television broadcasting industry as a Senior Account Executive/Sales Manager and as on On-Air personality. Eric has been working in the Information Technology industry for the past 6 years as a Business developer in areas such as SEO, PPC, VOIP and Managed Services. Eric spends his down time enjoying the beauty of Lake Tahoe, Reno and the Great Basin area Cycling, Arts and Culture, Motorcycle riding, Hiking and dining in the Biggest Little City!


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: Eric.Govan@advisetech.com


Gerald Williams

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Gerald Williams

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Gerald Williams was born and raised in Southern California. He served in the Military as a Computer, Electronics, and Radar Technician and Instructor for ten years. After his military service, he worked for three years as a field engineer for a front-end processor company. From there, he worked for fifteen years providing technical support for a data services company. This was followed by fifteen more years as a Network Engineer for the same company. Gerald relocated to Northern Nevada in early 2014.


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: Gerald.Williams@advisetech.com


John Hart

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

John Hart

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

John Hart has been providing IT support businesses throughout Southern California for 17 years. John has supported firms in Architecture, Printing, Law, and Healthcare. John is experienced with writing and enforcing compliance policy and procedures, data and user account security and data encryption to protect your sensitive customer and business data.

John lives in Santa Monica with his family and enjoys playing basketball, bike riding and reading mystery novels.


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: John.Hart@advisetech.com


Joseph Hawkins

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Joseph Hawkins

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: Joseph.Hawkins@advisetech.com


Rick Rosenbaum

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Rick Rosenbaum

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Rick Rosenbaum was born and raised in Silicon Valley (south of the San Francisco Bay) and moved to Nevada in 1996. He has over twenty five years of experience in the computer, networking, telecommunications, and IT industries. He has held senior positions in technical support, technical sales engineering, and technical marketing at Cisco Systems, AT&T, and other companies. During these years, he worked in more than ten countries.

Rick enjoys hiking, skiing, and photography and has been happily married to his wife, Sue, for eighteen years.


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: rick.rosenbaum@advisetech.com


Jesse Martinez

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Jesse Martinez

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

I’ve been in the IT field for over 18 years love the world of Technology and all it encompasses. I enjoy going to the gym and cooking when ever the chance arises . Im married and have 5 children 4 boys and 1 girl all grown and having great careers.


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: Jesse.Martinez@advisetech.com


Manoj Kumar Popuri

SECURITY ANALYST

Manoj Kumar Popuri

SECURITY ANALYST

Manoj is experienced in Vulnerability Management and Penetration Testing of Windows, Linux, Network Infrastructure, Standalone, and web applications. He is a Certified Ethical Hacker and a Certified Web Application Security Analyst.


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: Manoj.Popuri@advisetech.com


Timothy E. Dick

SYSTEM ENGINEERING & SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Timothy E. Dick

SYSTEM ENGINEERING & SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Born, raised and currently living in Los Angeles County. After college continued education at Control Data Institute(College America) majoring in Computer Science while working for AT&T. Over 30 years of experience with Information System security, software and hardware infrastructures. Worked and traveled extensively for 13 years providing IT network engineering, management and EUC service for Mitsubishi Motor Sales of North America. 16 years in IT engineering and EUC for Computer Sciences Corporation and Alcoa Corporation provisioning for several of the large scale companies in the aerospace and defense industries. Over 8 years experience in healthcare IT environments including St. Joseph’s Hospital, Divinity Health Care Systems and Kaiser Permanente Foundation. Extensive experience and training with (EMR) Electronic Medical Records Systems and the provisional support structures.


Phone:866.766.1313

Email: Timothy.Dick@advisetech.com


James Delano

IN MEMORY

James Delano

IN MEMORY

Memoriam
James joined AdviseTech in 2007 and became a very important part of our Clients support system. Unfortunately James was killed in February 2016 and left a big VOID with AdviseTech and our Clients alike. James is being missed every day and we hope wherever he is, he realizes how much he meant to all of us.
We miss you James. R.I.P



Mike Schaaff

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Mike Schaaff

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

My career in technology started in 1989 as a Systems Operator working with HP/3000 mainframes. In the early 1990’s I moved from mainframe support to PC support as a Field Technician. Performing computer upgrades of motherboards, hard drives, memory and network cable installations.
As technology evolves so did my career as I later accepted a job with the position of System Support Specialist. I provided contracted on-site support for companies such as PPG, Petersen Publishing Company and Baxter International.
My talents were refined by over 28 years of hands-on experience in the information management and technology fields.
I enjoy working for AdviseTech as a company who values integrity and is dedicated like me in providing superior customer service and technology support.


Email: mike.schaaff@advisetech.com


Alexandro Duvot

DIRECTOR OF IT

Alexandro Duvot

DIRECTOR OF IT

In a world of Information Technology, I provide technical support on hardware or software. I have been supporting desktops, laptops and network devices for over a decade. I like working with computers and networking devices. I am a technical business resource provider, an engineer, an information technologist. I enjoy working with content management systems, CRMS, Web Portals and implementing SEO. From hands-on, remote or web, technology makes my world go round.
When I am not troubleshooting or doing web research, you can find me watching cartoon animation with my children and playing video games, I enjoy playing music and cooking for my family.


Phone:866-766-1313

Email: alexandro.duvot@advisetech.com


Bruce Borowy

Bruce Borowy



Robert J Williams

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Robert J Williams

SYSTEM SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Rob Williams grew up on the east coast in VA and NC. He served in the US Marine Corps as an Avionics technician. After leaving the military he began working in Chicago as a Field Engineer for a company that makes electronics manufacturing equipment. In that position he was primarily responsible for deploying IT systems to program and manage the manufacturing automation. He has traveled the world and worked with end users in many countries. After moving to Los Angeles in 2006, he took a position as an IT systems administrator for a shoe and accessory manufacturer. There he was responsible for setting up and maintaining networking, server systems and overseeing desktop help desk technicians. In that role he was able to make considerable changes and improvements to an outdated infrastructure.
When not at the keyboard, Rob enjoys weight lifting, hiking, surfing, snowboarding and radio controlled aircraft


Phone:866-766-1313


Lyft has eaten into Uber’s U.S. market share, new data suggests

Lyft has eaten into Uber’s U.S. market share, new data suggests

Last Thursday, it looked as though Lyft would be the first ride-hailing unicorn to go public, after it confidentially filed a draft form for an IPO. But its bigger competitor, Uber, eliminated Lyft’s lead the following day when its own plans to go public were reported. Both are expected to hit the public markets as soon as the first quarter of 2019.

So where do they stand?

As of October, Uber and Lyft combined owned nearly 98 percent of the U.S. consumer ride-sharing market, according to new data from Second Measure, a company that analyzes billions of anonymized credit and debit card purchases. Uber held 69.2 percent (3 percentage points lower than in October 2017) according to Second Measure, while Lyft controlled 28.4 percent (3 percentage points higher than last year). Juno, Gett and Via split up the remaining 2.4 percent.

Second Measure’s Lyft estimates (28.4 percent) are a bit lower than the 35 percent market share the company claimed earlier this year, though Lyft’s numbers would include Canadian sales as well as corporate spending on rides. Uber doesn’t disclose market share numbers. Lyft and Uber both declined to comment on the data.

Both companies grew their revenue since last year, according to Second Measure, but Lyft’s grew 32 percent — twice as fast as Uber did when you compare October 2017 to October 2018.

According to Uber, its third-quarter revenue — which includes revenue from Uber Eats, its international business and payments from business accounts — increased a much higher 38 percent year over year to $2.95 billion. Second Measure’s numbers, which don’t include Uber Eats — Uber’s fastest-growing business — and are for U.S. consumers only, show 17 percent growth in that time.

A report from The Information, citing a person familiar with Lyft’s figures, said that Lyft’s U.S. and Canada revenue more than doubled in the first half of 2018 to $909 million. According to Second Measure’s data, Lyft’s U.S.-only revenue rose 71 percent in that time.

Note that Second Measure’s estimates of Uber’s ride-sharing sales included revenue from Uber Eats until May 2017, when the measurement company was able to separate the two. That made Uber’s ride-sharing market share slightly higher than it should have been prior to that timeframe.



Patch Tuesday breaks records — some good, most bad — and ‘Check for Updates’ still stings

Patch Tuesday breaks records — some good, most bad — and ‘Check for Updates’ still stings

Yesterday, Microsoft’s “B Week” Patch Tuesday, we saw a fairly small set of patches — “small” being a relative designation. There are 194 December updates in the Microsoft Catalog, with 39 separately identified security holes (CVEs), and with every supported version of Windows, Office and .Net getting a dose. We also got a new Security Advisory, which lists two new Servicing Stack Updates.

As usual, Martin Brinkman at ghacks.net has a full breakdown.

The zero-day

Only one of the patches relates to a known in-the-wild exploit, and that one’s pretty obscure. The CVE-2018-8611 security hole is yet another privilege elevation bug. That means if something odd gets into your computer, it can levitate itself up to admin status by taking advantage of this bug. Kaspersky Lab researchers found the security hole in exploits from two “threat actors” (read: groups with lots of money behind them, likely government-based) called FruityArmor and SandCat:

CVE-2018-8611 is a race condition that is present in the Kernel Transaction Manager due to improper processing of transacted file operations in kernel mode. … This vulnerability successfully bypasses modern process mitigation policies. … Combined with a compromised renderer process, for example, this vulnerability can lead to a full Remote Command Execution exploit chain in the latest state-of-the-art web-browsers. We have found multiple builds of exploit for this vulnerability. The latest build includes changes to reflect the latest versions of the Windows OS.

As long as you aren’t overly concerned about FruityArmor and SandCat, there’s no reason to apply the patch right away.

One acknowledged bug

Intrepid folks who have installed the patches have reported few problems. Of course, by my way of thinking, it’s much too early to tell if there are significant bugs in the patches, and I advise you to stay put until the unpaid beta-testers have their way.

There’s one bug that Microsoft has posted: The cumulative update for Win10 version 1803 — that’s the most common version of Windows 10 — KB 4471324carries a small surprise:

Customers are Making Traditional Transport Movement Obsolete, Fast

Customers are Making Traditional Transport Movement Obsolete, Fast

Let’s get down to the basics before we delve in more advanced tech. What is a business? An entity that offers a solution (or a set of solutions/products) to more than one customer. It caters to a defined or latent need. It offers this ‘value’ and accepts value back as compensation (money, time, or now, even access to personal info with permission). What are the elements in play here? There’s a business, a customer, and a market and customers are making traditional transport movement obsolete, fast.

A market is essentially a place or platform where the business and customer interact and exchange value.

Businesses look to create awareness for the products among the right-customers (target audience), make it available to the customer to try out or buy, put the final product into the hands of the customer, take feedback and offer after-sales service.

Internal threat:

Some businesses invest heavily in the current ‘way of doing things’ and discard the probabilities of the same ‘way of doing things’ evolving over time. We have seen this in businesses getting ‘cocky’ saying they know what the customers want and how they want it, just because it has worked for them before. It won’t necessarily work for them in the future. That’s why some like ‘Toy’s R Us’ fell by the side. Who’s to blame? No one. That’s the nature of evolution.

As customers and their needs improve, so does the market. How a business and customer interact and deal with each other, keeps evolving. A customer has multiple quality products that they can choose from. Customer needs are not “needs,” they are “demands.”

Businesses have become very good at making the best product, backed by great promotional campaigns. Also, now the customer has the tools required to make an intelligent choice about what they want to buy. There are peer-reviews in blogs and videos for them. In a heavily social word, word-of-mouth, or what we now call ‘viral’ coverage has made it very easy for quality products to be recognized. This covers the awareness.

Customers know what they want, do you?

Customers now know exactly what they want, and they know what everyone in the market is offering. They are well-prepared to make a wise choice. Some businesses have reached a saturation point to how much they can improve their products (as per customer’s needs). No matter how much they improve, there would be someone else who would do it better and market themselves more aggressively. Once customers agree that the competitor’s products are more suited to them, they will simply switch.

External threat:

What businesses considered as their core-differentiator, is becoming less and less unique. Competitors are closing on market leaders with their own identical or better products. As for the customer, they see more and more companies offering similar products and expect price-wars. Market leaders tend to reach their deep pockets and offer discounts to push the new-entrant competitors out of the business. This, however, restricts them to do what they were actually good at, building a product which evolved faster than how the customer’s need evolved.

Since the new entrants have moved the battle, they can attract external investment, use it to lay down a long runway for their growth, and keep eating into the market. Sooner rather than later, more new entrants join in. They are all attacking the big fish. Then, eventually, the market opens up with no clear leader. The previous leader would now share the stage with any one of the new-entrants (that hasn’t burn through their funds already) themselves. The product differentiators won’t be the same for long. Businesses must build more than one differentiator to sustain.

Make it available and convenient for the customer

Beyond the awareness and product quality, there is a very important part of the market that can create that additional value which makes the customer stay with a company. The ‘availability’ part. They can build a lasting differentiator here which would be extremely difficult to emulate.

Getting it into the hands of the customer at the right time, in the right manner. The movement of your product has to be perfect. Imagine going to a fine restaurant. Even though the food might be nice, if it is just slapped on to a plate and dumped in front of you, next time you would go to the restaurant which gives you more respect. That’s exactly the role good transportation practices play in end-customer satisfaction.

It starts with a delivery promise

Let’s run through a simulation. A customer goes to a portal and selects a product they like. They place the order and get an option. Do they want the product the next day or after two-days? They select the next-day. What was the point of giving the customer this option? They have already selected the product and probably would pay for it in the next instance. Why take the extra effort to put the product in their hands the next day itself?

Here, you are increasing the probability of getting-in on their next purchase. When they buy again, they would be more likely to come to you. There’s your differentiation. You just gave the customer the control over their delivery time window. There are even options where the customer can pick how they want to receive the product, to be left with a neighbor, to be gift-wrapped, etc. There’s a lot to say about these promises and the delight it creates for the customer.

Remember retail ambiance? Malls spent millions creating ‘that’ ideal ambiance with air conditioning and music to offer that extra delight which would make the customer come back. Ambiance has been replaced by the ideal ‘delivery experience’.

Create the highest value for customer, company, and economy

What’s in it for the customer? Faster delivery, more control over the timelines, and hence, higher value. For them they just got a discount, and on top of that, they are getting this amazing deal of faster delivery and other perks.

What’s in it for the company? Higher customer satisfaction and retention; and creating lasting business differentiation. Another factor from stationary retail that has evolved is the idea of an impulse buy. When customers are happier at the time of check-out, with the promise of getting hold of the product very soon, they are more inclined to buy large amounts and more frequently. Companies can, not just lengthen customer lifetime value, but also increase it multifold.

What’s in it for the market or economy? Customers have a higher buying power than before. When they are delighted by the perceived benefits of such purchases, they would buy more and support the economy (and connected businesses) more. There’s also the factor of technology evolution which goes hand in hand with these interactions. Almost, all elements of this market are backed by technology. And technology development directed by businesses (in need of market growth) always brings in high-levels of innovation.

Delivery promises turn into expectations and then experiences

It’s all well and good, as far as promising a great delivery experience to the customer goes. Now, the business must fulfill these promises. How would they ship a product halfway across the country in a day? Those that win this transportation challenge, win the market.

The secret lies in proper technology intervention and support.

The latest in cloud-based optimization solutions give businesses the ideal plan on how to best pick and load the product in-time from the warehouse, dispatch it on-time, track it as it moves through a route optimized to pass through minimal traffic – avoiding unnecessary delays and detention, reach the local distribution center, pass on the right product to the smaller vans quickly, and track the passage through connected scanning devices.

Now comes the tricky part, there are hundreds of such customers that requested next day delivery. This part of the distribution leg is called the last mile. Tons of literature is written about the complexities of such movement. There are multiple versions of the traveling salesman problem out there about this same scenario. Manually planning these complex legs ends with delays, which in turn lead to late or missed deliveries.

The irony of customer expectations is that now you potentially lost a customer because of an expectation the customer didn’t set themselves, but was prompted to do so by you. If you just hadn’t given them an option and said that the delivery would take two days, then all would be fine. But then, someone might have offered them a similar product in faster time and the customer might have gone for it. It’s a dilemma either way.

How the right technology makes it all fit into place

The only way out is to deliver on the promise every time, without fail. You can do it with the use of the right tech.

Since the last mile problem with multiple constraints, permutations, and real-time adjustments is too tough for a person to do daily, it can be put through an algorithm working on artificial intelligence and machine learning logic combined. This algorithm would suggest the perfect route, devoid of traffic to go along a delivery schedule which helps reach all destinations on-time. It would work on a continuously growing set of location data points that update live. All customer addresses would be verified in the system and the routes connecting them to the deliveries nearby would be made as short as possible. This would reduce overall turnaround time for the local distribution center, saving resource and time costs. The delivery schedule plan would give them ample idea about how to balance the incoming load and whether they need more vehicles to fulfill all deliveries.

Even along the different transportation legs, all moving elements are connected to a central monitoring system. Vehicle movement, in-transit product quality, driver behavior, package tracking from warehouse to distribution center – scanned at all entry-exit points. All this comes in the domain of what we have come to know as the Internet of Things. Through intricate and continuous connectivity, businesses can control all their movements from a single platform.

Such connected transportation, backed with instant notifications and alerts, gives a high degree of agility to the movement. Businesses can react to on-ground situations faster. Suppose, there is a vehicle breakdown, even before the driver calls up the manager, there would a repair or replacement vehicle on the way. It’s about covering all bases to ensure that there are no surprises when it comes to putting the desired product in the hands of the intended customer, on-time.

Technology is more acceptable than ever before. If all this seems futuristic, it’s not. It’s what’s happening in the world right now. To sustain in this environment businesses must accept that logistics, especially last mile optimization, is now a part of their value proposition to the end-customer.

Faiz Shaikh

Brand Content Manager

Faiz Shaikh heads brand content management in a globally leading cloud-based logistics optimization company, LogiNext. He has written multiple industry-renowned white papers covering tech-backed innovations in logistics and transportation. He continually writes deep insightful articles on the role of technology in improving last mile deliveries on multiple platforms.



The Best Portable Printers For Printing On The Go

The Best Portable Printers For Printing On The Go

Have you ever needed to print a photo or document in the car or away from home? If you run into this situation frequently, it might be time to grab a portable printer.

Not everybody needs a portable printer (some people don’t even have a printer in their house, let alone one that they can slip in a briefcase). But if you’re out in the field a lot for your job, and your job required printed documents like invoices or estimates, a good printer you can use right from the seat of your car or a client’s kitchen counter is invaluable.

Portable printers are more powerful and affordable than ever before. For the price of a regular, full-sized printer, you could buy a portable, battery-powered printer that’s about the size of a shoe box. Most portable printers are compatible with your cell phone, and some can even connect to the cloud, which makes it easy for you to print documents for work or school at the last minute.

But, like any other piece of technology, it’s hard to shop for the perfect portable printer. They all have different features and specifications that may be good for one person and bad for another. For example, if you need to print high-quality photos, then you don’t want to use a printer that has a low resolution. Luckily, most of the work’s been done for you. We’ve selected our favorite portable printers and figured out their strengths and shortcomings. Whether you need a cloud-compatible device or a dedicated mobile photo printer, we’ve got the right portable printer for you.

HP OfficeJet 250 Portable Printer ($280)

If you need a portable printer that can also scan documents, then you should take a look at the battery-powered HP OfficeJet 250. It features a 10-page document feeder, so you can easily process a large stack of papers or documents in the car or at a hotel. When you need to print a photo or document on the OfficeJet, you can do it via USB, Wi-Fi, or from your phone with the HP ePrint app. The OfficeJet prints documents at a resolution of 4800 x 1200 dpi, which is a good resolution for business documents or schoolwork (but not really good enough for photo printing).

Really, this is a great all-around portable printer. It’s got the scanner, it’s got the app, and it can fit in your backpack. While the OfficeJet may not be your first choice for photo printing, it’s a great tool for scanning and printing documents on the go.

Epson WorkForce WF-100 Mobile Printer ($230)

The Epson WorkFroce WF-100 is the speedy workhorse of portable printing. It has a resolution of 5760 x 1440 dpi, and can print both full-size documents as well as borderless 4 x 6 photos. It’s a great device for people who need to carry a very small printer in a backpack or tote bag, because it can wirelessly print from a phone, tablet, or computer via Wi-Fi direct, and it can charge from a Micro USB cable or AC adapter. The WorkForce also has a unique auto-shutoff feature to save battery life, which is great for people who are always in a hurry.

Speaking of people who are always in a hurry, the WorkForce also supports Amazon Dash, which means that it can detect when you’re running out of ink and automatically order some more. Yeah, this sounds like a great way to burn some money, but it’s also a neat feature for people who always forget to buy ink.

The only real downside to this printer is that it doesn’t work as a scanner (it only costs about $50 less than the HP OfficeJet 250, which has a scanner). But the WorkForce prints at a higher resolution than the HP Officejet with photo printing too, and it’s a lot more convenient and easy to use. That being said, the WorkForce it’s a great portable printer if you don’t need to scan any documents.

Canon Pixma iP110 Cloud Printer ($130)

The Canon Pixma iP110 is a powerful, affordable portable printer. Oddly enough, it has a higher resolution than the expensive Epson Workforce and HP Deskjet printers. The Pixma prints photos and documents at 9600 x 2400 dpi, which is more than enough for most professional purposes. Not to mention, the Pixma can print 4 x 6 photos, which makes it a great option for creatives as well as businesspeople. It has a good battery life, and it’s only about a foot wide, so it can fit in your backpack or tote bag.

Sadly, you can’t use the Pixma to scan or copy documents. But, the printer can print directly from your phone using the Air Print, Google Cloud Print, and the Canon Print apps. These apps add an element of cloud compatibility to the Pixma, and it makes it easier to print documents that friends and coworkers have shared with you.

Again, the Pixma is a great, affordable portable printer. It may not be as versatile as the WorkForce, and it may not have a scanner, but it prints high-quality photos and it’s relatively inexpensive.

HP DeskJet 1112 Compact Printer ($30)

Some people don’t need to print documents while they’re in the car or at the airport without any expensive bells and whistles. The HP DeskJet 1112 Compact Printer is a great compact printer for people who occasionally need to bring a printer out of the house. It doesn’t have a battery, which limits its portability, but it’s small enough to throw in the backseat of your car, and it costs less than a big meal at a restaurant.

Oh, a quick heads up… If you like the price of this printer, but you need something that can be used in the car or away from an outlet, then I’d suggest pairing it with a car power inverter or a mobile power bank. No sense having a portable printer you can’t use with the same ease you use your laptop.

So, what can a $30 printer do? Well, it can print at a resolution of 1200 x 1200 dpi, which is fine for text documents, invoices, or schoolwork. Although the HP DeskJet 1112 doesn’t have Wi-Fi compatibility or a mobile app, it does have a USB cable that you can connect to your computer. And it doesn’t have a scanner, but you could always use apps like CamScan if you find yourself in a situation where you need to scan a document.

Again, the HP DeskJet printer lacks a lot of functions, but it’s good at printing documents and it’s cheap as hell. It’s only about the size of a shoebox, so it’s good for when you occasionally need to take a printer on the road to a hotel or a client’s house. And you can always increase its portability by using it with a car power inverter or a mobile power bank.

Kodak Dock Wi-Fi Mobile Photo Printer ($140)

If you’re specifically looking for a portable photo printer, then you should take a look at the Kodak Dock. It’s high-quality photo printer that can print directly from your phone, laptop, tablet, USB stick, or digital camera via USB cable or Lightning power cable. It can also connect to your social media accounts or email addresses, which is useful for printing photos that you don’t have saved on your phone. Here’s the thing; the Kodak Dock can’t print standard sized documents. It exclusively prints 4 x 6 photos. But it prints 4 x 6 photos better than any other portable printer, which is a lot to say for a device that’s smaller than a shoebox.

The Kodak Dock uses dye-sublimation technology to produce photos. While the dye-sublimation process is similar to the Zinc thermal printing process, it produces photos that are a lot more true to color. That’s because it uses a peripheral ink cartridge that can process about 40 sheets of Kodak 4 x 6 premium photo paper. You can’t use any other ink cartridges with this device, and you’ll want to use high-quality photo paper to make the prints worth it. See where this is going? The Kodak Dock is a great solution for printing high-quality photos on the go, but it’s a lot more expensive and less versatile than a traditional photo printer. But, you know, that’s the trade-off for printing sharp photos away from home. If the idea of photo printing away from home is intriguing to you, be sure to check out our roundup of portable mini-photo printers here.



Try Pexels Videos to Find Green Screen Backgrounds

Try Pexels Videos to Find Green Screen Backgrounds

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Oracle files suit in federal court against US government over $10B Pentagon JEDI cloud contract, arguing that awarding it to one vendor is unfair and illegal (Ron Miller/TechCrunch)

Oracle files suit in federal court against US government over $10B Pentagon JEDI cloud contract, arguing that awarding it to one vendor is unfair and illegal (Ron Miller/TechCrunch)

Facebook updates its Life Events feature for profiles, letting users add animated photos or videos  —  Facebook today announced a redesign of its “Life Events” feature, which allows people to share significant milestones in their life, like an engagement, graduation, a new job, a move to a new city, and more.



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